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EN
  • Arabic - عربي
  • Chinese (traditional) - 中國傳統
  • Chinese (simplified) - 中国简化
  • English
  • Khmer - ភាសាខ្មែរ
  • Nepali - नेपाली
  • Pashto - پښتو
  • Persian - فارسى
  • Spanish - español
  • Swahili - Kiswahili
  • Vietnamese - tiếng việt
What are you waiting for?

FACT

Fertility issues are not a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines.

FACT

Fertility issues are not a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccines, including the COVID-19 vaccines, do not have any impact on fertility in women or men. 1-4 Antibodies formed from COVID-19 vaccination, or any vaccination, do not cause any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta.2
 

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) will not approve a vaccine for use in Australia unless it is safe and effective, including impacts on fertility.1,2

The COVID-19 vaccine, like other vaccines, works by training our bodies to develop antibodies to fight against the virus that causes COVID-19 to prevent future illness.2

The misinformation that COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility is based on a disproven idea that the spike proteins in COVID-19 and the Syncytin-1 protein (which help placenta development) are the same. This is not true.2,5

The data from clinical trials shows that COVID-19 vaccines do not affect fertility.5 

Many people have become pregnant after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine, including some who got vaccinated during COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials.3,5  While pregnant people were excluded from the trials and participants were asked to avoid pregnancy, there were 57 pregnancies that occurred across the trials of Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca. Within the vaccinated group there were:

  • 11 pregnancies and 0 miscarriages for Pfizer compared to 12 pregnancies and 1 miscarriage in the control group (unvaccinated).
  • 6 pregnancies and 0 miscarriages for Moderna compared to 7 pregnancies and 1 miscarriage in the control group (unvaccinated).
  • 12 pregnancies and 2 miscarriages for AstraZeneca compared to 9 pregnancies and 3 miscarriages in the control group (unvaccinated).5

In the USA, a report using the V-safe safety monitoring system data showed that 4,800 people had a positive pregnancy test after receiving a first dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, including Pfizer and Moderna.3

In the USA, a recent study compared pregnancy success rates among three groups of women, including women with antibodies from having been vaccinated against COVID-19, women with antibodies from having a recent infection with COVID-19, and women with no antibodies.3 The study found no differences in pregnancy success rates among the three groups.3

There is also no evidence that vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause male fertility problems and men should receive the COVID-19 vaccine.3

In the USA, a small study looked at sperm characteristics, such as quantity and movement, of 45 healthy men before and after vaccination with an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (including Pfizer and Moderna).3 Researchers found no significant changes in these sperm characteristics after vaccination.3 Fever from illness has been associated with short-term decrease in sperm production in healthy men.3 Although fever can be a side effect of COVID-19 vaccination, there is no evidence that fever after COVID-vaccination affects sperm production.3

COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for people who are trying to get pregnant now or might become pregnant in the future, as well as their partners.3

Women who are trying to become pregnant do not need to delay vaccination or avoid becoming pregnant after vaccination.4

Related facts

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